[APACHE DOCUMENTATION]

Module mod_alias

This module is contained in the mod_alias.c file, and is compiled in by default. It provides for mapping different parts of the host filesystem in the the document tree, and for URL redirection.
  • Alias
  • Redirect
  • RedirectTemp
  • RedirectPermanent
  • ScriptAlias

  • Alias

    Syntax: Alias url-path directory-filename
    Context: server config, virtual host
    Status: Base
    Module: mod_alias
    The Alias directive allows documents to be stored in the local filesystem other than under the DocumentRoot. URLs with a (%-decoded) path beginning with url-path will be mapped to local files beginning with directory-filename. Example:
    Alias /image /ftp/pub/image
    A request for http://myserver/image/foo.gif would cause the server to return the file /ftp_pub_image_foo.gif.

    Note that if you include a trailing / on the url-path then the server will require a trailing / in order to expand the alias. That is, if you use Alias /icons/ /usr/local/etc/httpd/icons/ then the url /icons will not be aliased.

    See also ScriptAlias.


    Redirect

    Syntax: Redirect [ status ] url-path url
    Context: server config, virtual host, directory, .htaccess
    Status: Base
    Module: mod_alias
    Compatibility: The directory and .htaccess context's are only available in versions 1.1 and later. The status argument is only available in Apache 1.2 or later.

    The Redirect directive maps an old URL into a new one. The new URL is returned to the client which attempts to fetch it again with the new address. Url-path a (%-decoded) path; any requests for documents beginning with this path will be returned a redirect error to a new (%-encoded) url beginning with url. Example:

    Redirect /service http://foo2.bar.com/service
    If the client requests http://myserver/service/foo.txt, it will be told to access http://foo2.bar.com/service/foo.txt instead.

    Note: Redirect directives take precedence over Alias and ScriptAlias directives, irrespective of their ordering in the configuration file. Also, Url-path must be an absolute path, not a relative path, even when used with .htaccess files or inside of <Directory> sections.

    If no status argument is given, the redirect will be "temporary" (HTTP status 302). This indicates to the client that the resources is has moved temporarily. The status argument can be used to return other HTTP status codes:

    permanent
    Returns a permanent redirect status (301) indicating that the resource has moved permanently.
    temp
    Returns a temporary redirect status (302). This is the default.
    seeother
    Returns a "See Other" status (303) indicating that the resource has been replaced.
    gone
    Returns a "Gone" status (410) indicating that the resource has been permanently removed. When this status is used the url argument should be omitted.
    Other status codes can be returned by giving the numeric status code as the value of status. If the status is between 300 and 399, the url argument must be present, otherwise it must be omitted. Note that the status must be known to the Apache code (see the function send_error_response in http_protocol.c).

    RedirectTemp

    Syntax: RedirectTemp url-path url
    Context: server config, virtual host, directory, .htaccess
    Status: Base
    Module: mod_alias
    Compatibility: This directive is only available in 1.2

    This directive makes the client know that the Redirect is only temporary. (Status 302). Exactly equivalent to Redirect temporary

    RedirectPermanent

    Syntax: RedirectPermanent url-path url
    Context: server config, virtual host, directory, .htaccess
    Status: Base
    Module: mod_alias
    Compatibility: This directive is only available in 1.2

    This directive makes the client know that the Redirect is permanent. (Status 301). Exactly equivalent to Redirect permanent


    ScriptAlias

    Syntax: ScriptAlias url-path directory-filename
    Context: server config, virtual host
    Status: Base
    Module: mod_alias
    The ScriptAlias directive has the same behavior as the Alias directive, except that in addition it marks the target directory as containing CGI scripts. URLs with a (%-decoded) path beginning with url-path will be mapped to scripts beginning with directory-filename. Example:
    ScriptAlias /cgi-bin/ /web/cgi-bin/
    A request for http://myserver/cgi-bin/foo would cause the server to run the script /web/cgi-bin/foo.


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